4gifs:

Explosive pods launch seeds up to 20ft

4gifs:

Explosive pods launch seeds up to 20ft

(Source: ForGIFs.com, via plurdledgabbleblotchits)

jtotheizzoe:

No bacterium is an island.
Many people think of bacteria as tiny Lone Rangers, paddling their flagellar canoes across the desolate petri dish sea. But in “the wild”, bacteria exist as complex, interwoven, constantly competing social communities.
Every scoop of soil is a battlefield of chemical chatter. Species send out molecular messages-in-a-bottle that ride the waves of diffusion to their mates. Some even thread electrical cables between neighboring cells. Now, new research has identified elaborate shared membranes that let single cells swarm as a superorganism …
Check out my latest article for Wired all about a soil bacterium named Myxococcus xanthus. It’s under everyone’s feet right now, and it has developed one of the most elaborate physical webs ever witnessed in bacteria. That’s it up top, devouring a colony of E. coli using its patented rippling wave attack.
It’s a stealth communication network that lets them hunt like a tiny wolfpack. So cool. Plus I got to use a GIF, so double win.
Once you’re done with that, check out this great TED talk from Bonnie Bassler all about how bacteria communicate.

jtotheizzoe:

No bacterium is an island.

Many people think of bacteria as tiny Lone Rangers, paddling their flagellar canoes across the desolate petri dish sea. But in “the wild”, bacteria exist as complex, interwoven, constantly competing social communities.

Every scoop of soil is a battlefield of chemical chatter. Species send out molecular messages-in-a-bottle that ride the waves of diffusion to their mates. Some even thread electrical cables between neighboring cells. Now, new research has identified elaborate shared membranes that let single cells swarm as a superorganism …

Check out my latest article for Wired all about a soil bacterium named Myxococcus xanthus. It’s under everyone’s feet right now, and it has developed one of the most elaborate physical webs ever witnessed in bacteria. That’s it up top, devouring a colony of E. coli using its patented rippling wave attack.

It’s a stealth communication network that lets them hunt like a tiny wolfpack. So cool. Plus I got to use a GIF, so double win.

Once you’re done with that, check out this great TED talk from Bonnie Bassler all about how bacteria communicate.

(via thatscienceguy)

biocanvas:

The excretory system of Schmidtea mediterranea, a small freshwater flatworm. S. mediterranea have a remarkable ability to regenerate. Cutting one in half will generate two fully functional flatworms; cutting it into quarters will generate four; and so on. In fact, scientists have shown that even a single cell from one flatworm is capable of regenerating an entire organism.
Image by Hanh Vu, Stowers Institute for Medical Research, Kansas City, Missouri.

biocanvas:

The excretory system of Schmidtea mediterranea, a small freshwater flatworm. S. mediterranea have a remarkable ability to regenerate. Cutting one in half will generate two fully functional flatworms; cutting it into quarters will generate four; and so on. In fact, scientists have shown that even a single cell from one flatworm is capable of regenerating an entire organism.

Image by Hanh Vu, Stowers Institute for Medical Research, Kansas City, Missouri.

sciencenote:


Embryonic Rat Thoracic Aorta Medial Layer Myoblast Cells (A-10 Line)
A culture of adherent A-10 rat thoracic aorta cells was fluorescently triple-labeled with MitoTracker Red CMXRos, Alexa Fluor 350 conjugated to phalloidin, and SYTOX Green, targeting the mitochondria, filamentous actin network, and nuclei, respectively.
In this image, the bright red mitochondrial network is superimposed on a deep blue actin cytoskeletal framework centered around the green nuclei.

sciencenote:

Embryonic Rat Thoracic Aorta Medial Layer Myoblast Cells (A-10 Line)

A culture of adherent A-10 rat thoracic aorta cells was fluorescently triple-labeled with MitoTracker Red CMXRos, Alexa Fluor 350 conjugated to phalloidin, and SYTOX Green, targeting the mitochondria, filamentous actin network, and nuclei, respectively.

In this image, the bright red mitochondrial network is superimposed on a deep blue actin cytoskeletal framework centered around the green nuclei.

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