littlelimpstiff14u2:

Antarctica from space

littlelimpstiff14u2:

Antarctica from space

(via plurdledgabbleblotchits)

sagansense:

jtotheizzoe:

I don’t want to alarm anyone, but on Saturday, the moon ate Saturn.
I guess it finally got tired of it showing off those rings.
(just kidding, this was a rare and wonderful occultation of Saturn by the moon, captured here by Colin Legg. Read more at Bad Astronomy)

sagansense:

jtotheizzoe:

I don’t want to alarm anyone, but on Saturday, the moon ate Saturn.

I guess it finally got tired of it showing off those rings.

(just kidding, this was a rare and wonderful occultation of Saturn by the moon, captured here by Colin Legg. Read more at Bad Astronomy)

(via birdwithapeopleface)

ageofdestruction:

transit: Venus and the Sun, photographed by Solar Dynamics Observatory, 5th & 6th June 2012.
Venus is held at centre frame. This gif covers about seven and a quarter hours of real time.
More gifs.
Image credit: NASA/SDO & AIA/EVE/HMI teams. Animation: AgeOfDestruction.

ageofdestruction:

transit: Venus and the Sun, photographed by Solar Dynamics Observatory, 5th & 6th June 2012.

Venus is held at centre frame. This gif covers about seven and a quarter hours of real time.

More gifs.

Image credit: NASA/SDO & AIA/EVE/HMI teams. Animation: AgeOfDestruction.

(via crookedindifference)

nevver:

Jupiter and Io
spaceplasma:

Trojans and Hildas

Here are some asteroids viewed in a rotating frame of reference where Jupiter almost stands still. The Trojans, in green, are asteroids that stay near the Lagrange points 60° ahead or behind Jupiter.  They go around the Sun once each time Jupiter orbits the Sun.  But the Hildas, in purple, go around the Sun 3 times while Jupiter goes around twice.  We say they’re in a 3:2 resonance with Jupiter. 
The Hildas seem to be moving in a triangular pattern.  But actually each one takes an elliptical orbit around the Sun.  There are three kinds of ellipses. Two go farthest from the Sun near the Lagrange points, while one goes farthest from the Sun opposite Jupiter.  Although the whole triangle of Hildas is nearly equilateral, it’s not quite.  The side between the two Lagrange points is a bit different from the two other sides.   You can also see the whole triangle pulsing as Jupiter moves in and out!
These animated gifs were made by Petr Scheirich, and you can have hours of fun looking at his website: http://sajri.astronomy.cz/asteroidgroups/groups.htmThere’s a lot to say about Trojans and Lagrange points, but let me talk about Hildas. Over 1,100 Hildas have been found, the being Hilda, named after the discoverer’s daughter.  It’s big - 175 kilometers in diameter - but not very bright, because it’s made of ancient stuff containing lots of carbon, similar to the nucleus of a comet.
The Hildas don’t form a ‘true’ asteroid family, because they aren’t fragments of a single parent object.  Instead, they’re a ‘dynamical’ family: they’re defined by having similar orbits.    Any Hilda’s orbit has an eccentricity less than 0.3, an inclination less than 20°, and a semi-major axis between 3.7 AU and 4.2 AU.  Remember, the semi-major axis of an ellipse is half the distance between the farthest points.So, the Hildas are outside the main asteroid belt, which lies between the 4:1 resonance with Jupiter at 2.1 AU and the 2:1 resonance at 3.0 AU.
The density of Hildas near the triangle’s corners is more than twice the density on the sides. The reason is that the Hildas move more slowly when they’re farther from the Sun!   So, they stay near the corners for an average of 5.0-5.5 years, but move along the sides of the triangle more quickly, for 2.5 to 3.0 years. The overall period of the Hildas is about 7.9 years, which is 2/3 the period of Jupiter.

Credit: John Baez, Petr Scheirich

spaceplasma:

Trojans and Hildas

Here are some asteroids viewed in a rotating frame of reference where Jupiter almost stands still. The Trojans, in green, are asteroids that stay near the Lagrange points 60° ahead or behind Jupiter.  They go around the Sun once each time Jupiter orbits the Sun.  But the Hildas, in purple, go around the Sun 3 times while Jupiter goes around twice.  We say they’re in a 3:2 resonance with Jupiter. 


The Hildas seem to be moving in a triangular pattern.  But actually each one takes an elliptical orbit around the Sun.  There are three kinds of ellipses. Two go farthest from the Sun near the Lagrange points, while one goes farthest from the Sun opposite Jupiter.  Although the whole triangle of Hildas is nearly equilateral, it’s not quite.  The side between the two Lagrange points is a bit different from the two other sides.   You can also see the whole triangle pulsing as Jupiter moves in and out!

These animated gifs were made by Petr Scheirich, and you can have hours of fun looking at his website: http://sajri.astronomy.cz/asteroidgroups/groups.htm

There’s a lot to say about Trojans and Lagrange points, but let me talk about Hildas. Over 1,100 Hildas have been found, the being Hilda, named after the discoverer’s daughter.  It’s big - 175 kilometers in diameter - but not very bright, because it’s made of ancient stuff containing lots of carbon, similar to the nucleus of a comet.


The Hildas don’t form a ‘true’ asteroid family, because they aren’t fragments of a single parent object.  Instead, they’re a ‘dynamical’ family: they’re defined by having similar orbits.    Any Hilda’s orbit has an eccentricity less than 0.3, an inclination less than 20°, and a semi-major axis between 3.7 AU and 4.2 AU.  Remember, the semi-major axis of an ellipse is half the distance between the farthest points.

So, the Hildas are outside the main asteroid belt, which lies between the 4:1 resonance with Jupiter at 2.1 AU and the 2:1 resonance at 3.0 AU.


The density of Hildas near the triangle’s corners is more than twice the density on the sides. The reason is that the Hildas move more slowly when they’re farther from the Sun!   So, they stay near the corners for an average of 5.0-5.5 years, but move along the sides of the triangle more quickly, for 2.5 to 3.0 years. The overall period of the Hildas is about 7.9 years, which is 2/3 the period of Jupiter.

Credit: , Petr Scheirich

(Source: Wikipedia, via birdwithapeopleface)

zerostatereflex:

New images of Saturn’s Hexagon! 
“This colorful view from NASA’s Cassini mission is the highest-resolution view of the unique six-sided jet stream at Saturn’s north pole known as “the hexagon.” This movie, made from images obtained by Cassini’s imaging cameras, is the first to show the hexagon in color filters, and the first movie to show a complete view from the north pole down to about 70 degrees north latitude.”

zerostatereflex:

New images of Saturn’s Hexagon! 

This colorful view from NASA’s Cassini mission is the highest-resolution view of the unique six-sided jet stream at Saturn’s north pole known as “the hexagon.” This movie, made from images obtained by Cassini’s imaging cameras, is the first to show the hexagon in color filters, and the first movie to show a complete view from the north pole down to about 70 degrees north latitude.”

(Source: photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov, via yourdamncroissant)

sci-universe:

This is an image of Venus taken in 1974 by NASA’s Mariner 10 space probe. The planet is blanketed by a thick veil of clouds high in carbon dioxide. 

sci-universe:

This is an image of Venus taken in 1974 by NASA’s Mariner 10 space probe. The planet is blanketed by a thick veil of clouds high in carbon dioxide. 

(via crookedindifference)

jtotheizzoe:

NASA, JPL and the Cassini imaging team debuted a new view of Earth today. 
I know what you’re thinking. That’s not Earth, that’s Saturn. Look closer.
Earlier this year, as Cassini happened to pass behind Saturn, eclipsing the sun, its camera was turned toward home. A new silhouette of the ringed planet was captured (you NEED to view it larger here), and just wow, man.
Amid dozens of background stars, four planets and a few million pixels worth of wonder, my favorite part is the hazy outer ring of water vapor, spewed out from the leaky moon Enceladus and its geysers.

Earth appears in the lower right, clear and blue, joined by our moon in this enlarged image:

There’s your new selfie.
Science truly begets beauty.

jtotheizzoe:

NASA, JPL and the Cassini imaging team debuted a new view of Earth today.

I know what you’re thinking. That’s not Earth, that’s Saturn. Look closer.

Earlier this year, as Cassini happened to pass behind Saturn, eclipsing the sun, its camera was turned toward home. A new silhouette of the ringed planet was captured (you NEED to view it larger here), and just wow, man.

Amid dozens of background stars, four planets and a few million pixels worth of wonder, my favorite part is the hazy outer ring of water vapor, spewed out from the leaky moon Enceladus and its geysers.

Earth appears in the lower right, clear and blue, joined by our moon in this enlarged image:

There’s your new selfie.

Science truly begets beauty.

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